chalara dieback symptoms

They then wilt and discolour to black. It has already caused widespread damage to ash populations in continental Europe. The natural host range of the fungus includes F. excelsior, F. angustifolia, F. ornus, F. nigra, F. pennsylvanica, F. americana and F. mandschurica. Chalara fraxinea leeft parasitair in bladweefsels, twijgen en verhoute delen van de boom. Chalara fraxinea tast zowel jonge als oude bomen aan en dringt het parenchym van de houtstralen binnen. Leaves might shed early. Chalara dieback of ash is a serious disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Hymenoscyphus fraxineus.. Chalara fraxinea, Version 3.1 revised 9 August 2012, Table 2, p.4 5 Forest Research, Rapid Risk Assessment: Rapid assessment of the need for a detailed Pest Risk Assessment for Chalara fraxinea, Version 3.1 revised 9 August 2012, p.4 6 Forestry Commission, Ash dieback disease page on … Symptoms Guide of Chalara Dieback of Ash Ash trees su˜ering with symptoms from Chalara Fraxina are increasingly being found across Europe and now have been con˚rmed at a number of sites in the east of the country. times, RHS Registered Charity no. These fungi can also affect trees that are already suffering from Hymenoscyphus fraxineus. Impact Chalara has the potential to cause significant damage to the UK’s ash population. First confirmed in the UK in 2012, ash dieback (also known as Chalara or Chalara ash dieback) is a disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Hymenoscyphus fraxineus (formerly known as Chalara fraxinea).. Chalara dieback of ash is a disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Hymenoscyphus fraxineus. Keep up to date with the latest outbreak information and re-appraise the situation as necessary. Ash dieback, Chalara or Chalara dieback is a disease that affects ash trees and is caused by a fungus called Hymenoscyphus fraxineus. From the leaves, the fungus makes its way down the petioles, rachises and stems. Its proper name is Chalara dieback, named after a fungus called Chalara fraxinea Symptoms include lesions at the base of dead side shoots, … Ash dieback fungal disease, which has infected some 90% of the species in Denmark, is threatening to devastate Britain's 80m ash population. Sightings in Northern Ireland should be reported via TreeCheck. The disease causes leaf loss and crown dieback, usually leading to tree death. If you find a suspected case of ash dieback in an area where it has not previously been reported (see the distribution map on the Forestry Commission website) you should report your suspicions to the relevant plant health authority by submitting a report via TreeAlert. Ash dieback is characterised by three symptoms: 1. These months are the best time of year to survey ash trees for chalara symptoms in the foliage. Ash trees suffering from symptoms likely to be caused by Chalara fraxinea (C. fraxinea) … Because the disease is now so widespread the movement ban on ash within the UK and from EU countries has now been lifted. RHS Garden Hyde Hall Spring and Orchid Show, Free entry to RHS members at selected However, many cases have now been confirmed in the wider environment in the UK and the disease is widely distributed. Results from the 2016 Chalara Ash Dieback Survey, indicate a further spread of Chalara across Northern Ireland and to native Ash in the countryside. In 2018 ash dieback has been found infecting three new ornamental tree and shrub species in the UK. Following the discovery of the disease in the UK, the Forestry Commission have been investigating the spread of the disease. The damage is usually seen in May. The spores land on leaves or other parts of the trees. In the subsequent years, the disease symptoms were observed in all regions of the Chalara dieback of ash is a serious disease of ash trees caused by a fungus which was previously called Chalara fraxinea, now known as Hymenoscyphus fraxineus. Background The Forestry Commission lists 15 pests and diseases present in Britain that pose a threat to tree health. This report sets out the main potential impacts of ash dieback caused by Chalara fraxinea covering the likely environmental, economic, landscape and social consequences. The main symptoms of ash dieback are: Dead branches; Blackening of leaves which often hang on the tree; Discoloured stems often with a diamond-shape lesion where a leaf was attached; Trees may eventually drop limbs, collapse or fall. Dead tops and/ or side shoots at the base of dead side shoots, lesions can often be found on the subtending branch or stem 2. Ash dieback is a disease affecting ash trees caused by the fungus Chalara fraxinea. However, both Forest Research and the country forestry authorities are keen to receive reports of ash dieback in parts of the country where it has not already been recorded. RHS members can get exclusive individual advice from the RHS Gardening Advice team. The apothecia are produced from June to October on ash leaf petioles and rachises (stalks) from the previous year in the leaf litter. Forestry Commission Forestry Commission Tree Alert, Join By working together we can manage its impact. Ash trees suffering with Chalara dieback infection have been found widely across Europe since trees now believed to have been infected with this newly identified pathogen were reported dying in large numbers in Poland in 1992. Chalara ash dieback targets ash trees, especially young ones. The objective of this study was to establish statistically based associations among macroscopic symptoms of crown dieback, cankers due to Chalara fraxinea, and symptoms caused by other pathogens and pests on Fraxinus excelsior.A total of 454 trees were observed in two plots of a 15‐year‐old experimental stand. The fungus was previously called Chalara fraxinea, hence the name of the disease Ash Dieback.. Ash Dieback was first identified in Poland in 1992. Chalara dieback of ash, also known as Chalara or ash dieback, is a disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Hymenoscyphus fraxineus. Identifying ash dieback It is recommended that you familiarise yourself with the symptoms of ash dieback so you can assess the health of your ash trees and the severity of the infection in your area. Chalara has now infected ash trees throughout Silk Wood at Westonbirt Arboretum, and in order to ensure the future health of this ancient woodland, Forestry England is now faced with having to respond to this threat to maintain the health of Silk Wood for future generations. Ash dieback, Hymenoscyphus fraxineus (formerly known as Chalara fraxinea), is the most significant tree disease to affect the UK since Dutch Elm Disease. The disease causes leaf loss and crown dieback in affected trees and it may lead to tree death. Keywords Chalara fraxinea.Genetic variability.Tree diseases.RAMS markers.Population genetics Introduction At the beginning of the 1990s, the first symptoms of increased dieback of ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) were observed in north-eastern Poland. This is where it was first recorded in the UK back in 2012. - On Stems: Small lens-shaped lesions or necrotic spots appear on the bar of stems and branches and enlarge to form perennial cankers.The infection may girdle and kill the stem. Background information on the disease, its origins, symptoms and precautions to reduce risks of spread are available from the Forestry Commission here. This is likely to prevent any spore dispersal and may help to slow the spread of the disease in an affected area. The fungus can also produce asexual spores, but these are not believed to be infectious and can only spread over short distances by water splash. There is no chemical control available to gardeners for this disease. This disease has spread quickly and is now affecting woodlands across the UK, leading to the death of thousands of trees. The disease causes leaf loss and crown dieback in affected trees, and is usually fatal. These species; mock privet (Phillyrea latifolia), narrow-leaved mock privet (Phillyrea angustifolia) and white fringe tree (Chionanthus virginicus) are in the same family as ash (Oleaceae). These have included forest trees, trees in urban areas such as parks and gardens, and also young trees in nurseries. This leaflet provides some practical advice on managing Chalara’s impacts on biodiversity and the landscape, protecting economic returns from timber production, safeguarding The fungus has several pathways of spread over long distances; It can be spread  through the movement of diseased ash plants and logs or unsawn wood from infected trees. Chalara ash dieback targets ash trees, especially young ones. Ash dieback regulations, information and advice for Scotland. Chalara causes leaf loss, crown dieback and bark lesions in affected trees. When it is producing asexual spores the fungus is known as Chalara fraxinea, and the disease is therefore sometimes called Chalara dieback or just Chalara. Ash Dieback, also known as Chalara dieback of ash, is a serious fungal disease that is killing ash across Europe. Symptoms. The common ash (Fraxinus excelsior) is very susceptible to infection. We see evidence of the disease throughout the UK. The common ash (Fraxinus excelsior) is very susceptible to infection. Symptoms Guide of Chalara Dieback of Ash (The fungus was previously called Chalara fraxinea, hence the name of the disease). Accept the use of alternative plant species on planning applications. – What trees does it affect? Ash Dieback ‘Chalara’ Update. The new sh… English: Symptoms of Chalara ash dieback.A fungal disease affecting the ash trees of Europe. Chalara Ash Dieback is a disease that is infecting ash trees across Europe and the UK. “It’s been called a ‘period of ‘Ecological Collapse’” said Ted Talbot, countryside manager for the National Trust in the Peak District. The disease causes leaf loss, lesions on the bark and dieback on the crown (top) of the tree. Managing Chalara dieback of ash in North West of England Woodland Ash Management Taking action in woodland In high-infection areas DO NOT: •ush to fell because Chalara is present; R • Remove recently planted ash trees with no symptoms – you might remove some disease tolerant ones; or • Kill ash coppice stools showing no symptoms. Small lesions can appear on the bark of stems and enlarge over time (2). Until a ban was applied on all movement of ash trees and seeds in October 2012, high volumes of ash (F. excelsior) were imported every year either for forestry or non-forestry purposes; therefore the potential for entry of the pathogen to the UK was very high. Using the identification guides cited above have a close look at your trees and see if the symptoms are consistent with those of Chalara ash dieback; just because your trees do not have a full, healthy crown does not mean that they are infected with this disease. The least susceptible species are F. americana and F. mandschurica. The disease caused by a fungus known as Chalara Fraxinea, causes premature leaf loss and crown dieback in ash trees which can ultimately lead to death in infected trees. Ash dieback What ash dieback is. Chalara fraxinea, known as ash dieback disease, is a relatively newly described fungal disease of ash which was first named in 2006 although dieback symptoms in … %PDF-1.6 %���� Symptoms of Ash Dieback include: - On leaves: Black blotches appear often at the leaf base and midrib.Affected leaves will wilt leading to leaf loss. A younger ash tree will die more quickly than a mature one. Be vigilant for symptoms of the disease of Council maintained trees and report them to the Forestry Commission if necessary. The Symptoms: – Dark patches develop on leaves in the summer A fatal fungal disease of ash trees. image caption Ash dieback started to be noticed in the 1990s although it it only more recently that scientists discovered that the fungus Chalara fraxinea was the cause. the RHS today and get 12 months for the price of 9. The Royal Horticultural Society is the UK’s leading gardening charity. The shaded squares show areas where Chalara dieback has been confirmed to be affecting ash trees in the natural environment, and the colour of the square shows which year … Hymenoscyphus fraxineus is an Ascomycete fungus that causes ash dieback, a chronic fungal disease of ash trees in Europe characterised by leaf loss and crown dieback in infected trees. Join the RHS today and support our charitable work, Keep track of your plants with reminders & care tips – all to help you grow successfully, For the latest on RHS Shows in 2020 and 2021, read more, RHS members get free access to RHS Gardens, Free entry to RHS members at selected times », Reduced prices on RHS Garden courses and workshops, Our Garden Centres and online shops are packed with unique and thoughtful gifts and decorations to make your Christmas sparkle, General enquiries Picture shows how the wood within a branch turns a brownish-grey colour, which often extends longitudinally down the stem or branch. What is Ash Dieback? Het is nog niet duidelijk hoe de schimmel zich verspreidt. Ash dieback is a disease of ash trees caused by the fungus Chalara fraxinea [1] . We aim to enrich everyone’s life through plants, and make the UK a greener and more beautiful place. It will change the UK landscape forever and threaten many species which rely on ash. The pest ash bud moth (Prays fraxinella) affects Fraxinus excelsior causing hollowing out of buds and removal of bark at the base of shoots, sometimes leading to shoot killing. Among the first symptoms that an ash tree might be infected with H. fraxineusis blackening and wilting of leaves and shoots (top picture) in mid- to late summer (July to September). Ash dieback-Chalara fraxinea. Mon – Fri | 9am – 5pm, Join the RHS today and support our charity. The devastating rate of ash tree decline across the UK is caused by the fungal pathogen Hymenoscyphus fraxineus.It is a sack like fungus that causes ash dieback also known as Chalara dieback of ash.This is a chronic disease of ash trees that has spread across Europe, it is characterised by leaf loss and crown dieback in infected trees. Download View Overview. A fungal disease affecting the ash trees of Europe. “Doesn’t sound nice, does it?” Ash dieback, Hymenoscyphus fraxineus (formerly known as Chalara fraxinea), is the most significant tree disease to affect the UK since Dutch Elm Disease. Ash dieback is a devastating tree disease that has the potential to kill up to 95% of ash trees across the UK. The disease originated in Asia and its spread attributed to the movement of plants as part of the global trade. Due to the severity of ash dieback, the conidial fungus Chalara fraxinea has been on the EPPO Alert list Chalara fraxinea, known as ash dieback disease, is a relatively newly described fungal disease of ash which was first named in 2006 although dieback symptoms in … Ash dieback fungal disease, which has infected some 90% of the species in Denmark, is threatening to devastate Britain's 80m ash population. Ash dieback is a serious disease of ash trees, caused by a fungus now called Hymenoscyphus fraxineus. Cankers caused by the fungus Neonectria ditissima and the bacterium Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. These findings are unlikely to have a big impact on the environment as these plants are not native or widespread in the UK. A 3D model of a hypothetical ash (Fraxinus excelsior) woodland was developed to represent the symptoms and spread of Chalara ash dieback (Chalara … x�� \SW���}�%�,���%$Ž�ADE�n�h����ԥu��RZ��w�{g�5ĥXmk[�Mk�im�{�2ӕ�]g����}�v��~����%�}�=������}b �x�����rL��U���|�������~����,+7�Ş����(�SZV�ɓ��l� �c&N���. Hymenoscyphus fraxineus has been isolated from the roots of symptomatic trees, as well as from leaves, shoots and branch/stem lesions. It blocks the water transport systems in trees causing leaf loss, lesions in the wood and on the bark and ultimately the dieback of the crown of the tree. It is particularly pathogenic to European ash, fraxinus excelsior. 1 0 obj<>/Metadata 245 0 R/Pages 2 0 R/StructTreeRoot 48 0 R/Type/Catalog>> endobj 2 0 obj<> endobj 3 0 obj<> endobj 5 0 obj<>/MediaBox[0 0 540 720]/Resources<>/Font<>/ProcSet[/PDF/Text/ImageB/ImageC/ImageI]/ExtGState<>>>/Type/Page>> endobj 6 0 obj<> endobj 7 0 obj<> endobj 8 0 obj<> endobj 9 0 obj[250 0 0 0 0 0 778 0 0 0 0 0 250 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 611 667 0 611 0 0 0 333 444 0 0 0 667 722 611 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 500 500 444 0 444 0 0 500 278 0 0 278 722 500 500 0 0 389 389 278 0 0 667 0 0 389 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 760] endobj 10 0 obj<> endobj 11 0 obj<> endobj 12 0 obj[226 0 0 0 0 0 705 0 312 312 0 0 0 0 267 430 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 276 0 0 0 0 0 0 606 561 529 630 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 423 874 0 0 532 0 563 473 495 0 591 0 0 520 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 494 537 418 537 503 316 474 537 246 0 480 246 813 537 538 537 0 355 399 347 537 473 745 0 474] endobj 13 0 obj<> endobj 14 0 obj<>stream Ash dieback is caused by the fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus.This fungus was previously known as Chalara fraxinea, which is why you may see or hear the disease referred to as ‘Chalara ash dieback’. Chalara Ash Dieback Ash Dieback is a lethal fungal disease of European and narrow-leaved ash trees, which appears impossible to control. First confirmed in the UK in 2012, ash dieback, also known as 'Chalara' or Chalara ash dieback, is a disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Hymenoscyphus fraxineus. Images of ash dieback on ornamental species can be found here. First confirmed in the UK in 2012, ash dieback (also known as Chalara or Chalara ash dieback) is a disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Hymenoscyphus fraxineus (formerly known as Chalara fraxinea).. Symptoms include leaf loss and crown dieback, and it can lead to the death of the tree. Chalara dieback of ash, also known as Chalara or ash dieback, is a disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Hymenoscyphus fraxineus. Chalara dieback of ash is a disease of ash trees caused by the fungus Chalara fraxinea. The latest distribution maps for cases of the disease in the wider environment can be found on the Forestry Commission website. The fungus spreads quickly as its spores are windborne. Chalara ash dieback in Scotland. The density of wider environment infections is still greatest in the east but there have now also been cases recorded in many other areas. - On Stems: Small lens-shaped lesions or necrotic spots appear on the bar of stems and branches and enlarge to form perennial cankers.The infection may girdle and kill the stem. It will lead to the decline and possible death of the majority of ash trees in Britain and has the potential to infect more than two billion ash trees (over 1.8 billion saplings and seedlings to more than 150 million … Accept the use of alternative plant species on planning applications. Ash dieback is a devastating tree disease that will kill up to 95% of ash trees across the UK. It can be difficult to identify the symptoms in larger trees. Symptoms of Ash Dieback include: - On leaves: Black blotches appear often at the leaf base and midrib.Affected leaves will wilt leading to leaf loss. Dieback of the shoots and leaves is visible in the summer. Leaves can suffer from wilting and black-brownish discoloration (1) and dieback of shoots and twigs is very characteristic. The latter disease has only been confirmed on Fraxinus excelsior. The fungus was described as a new fungal species in 2006 as the cause of ash (Fraxinus excelsior) mortality in European countries during the previous ten years. Ash dieback or Chalara dieback of ash to give it its full name is a very serious disease that is killing ash across all of Europe. Publications. Ash dieback's deadly grip is being felt all across the United Kingdom's woodlands. It is unknown how long the fungus was in the area before the symptoms became apparent, perhaps some years. Chalara dieback is described as "a serious disease of ash trees" caused by a fungus called Chalara fraxinea. However, the theory that spores wind-blown from the continent are a common source of entry is now widely accepted, as cases recorded in the wider environment were initially located in the eastern parts of the country. DO: Lesions which girdle the branch or stem can cause wilting of the foliage above 3. ... Ash dieback, Chalara, Chalara Ash dieback. Ash dieback can affect ash trees of all ages, although younger trees succumb to the disease much quicker. In the UK, ash dieback has had the most impact in the south-east of England. Young trees can be killed in one season and older trees tend to succumb after several seasons of infection. Ash trees suffering from symptoms likely to be caused by Chalara fraxinea (C. fraxinea) … Picture shows wilting of leaves caused by necrosis of the rachis . Mature trees affected by the disease initially display dieback of the shoots and twigs at the periphery of their crowns. Chalara Ash Dieback Ash Dieback is a lethal fungal disease of European and narrow-leaved ash trees, which appears impossible to control. If composting ash leaves in an area where ash dieback is known to be present, the Forestry Commission recommends covering them with with a 10cm (4-inch) layer of soil or a 15-30cm (6-12 inches) layer of other plant material, and leaving the heap undisturbed for a year (other than covering it with more material). The Chalara Viewer opposite shows England, Scotland and Wales and a grid of 10km squares ('hectads'). It is particularly pathogenic to European ash, fraxinus excelsior. Ash dieback is a disease of ash trees caused by the fungus Chalara fraxinea [1] . Pathogen Description The fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus causes ash dieback (it was previously known as Chalara fraxinea, hence its common name). The infectious spores (sexual) of the fungus are produced by fruiting bodies (apothecia) and can be wind-blown over long distances (20-30 km). Ash dieback disease was first observed in North and Central Europe in the 1990s (Bakys et al., 2009a; Kowalski and Holdenrieder, 2009b) and is now known throughout Europe. Chalara dieback of ash, also known as Chalara or Ash Dieback, is a disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called Hymenoscyphus fraxineus. Chalara dieback is a serious tree disease affecting Ash trees and is caused by fungus, leading to leaf loss and crown dieback. It blocks the water transport system … Sort by: Order: An Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Ash Dieback in Scotland. Be vigilant for symptoms of the disease of Council maintained trees and report them to the Forestry Commission if necessary. The first time in 2012 whether the symptoms in larger trees its common name.. And black-brownish discoloration ( 1 ) and dieback on ornamental species can be visible on leaves or other parts the! Chalara, Chalara ash dieback chalara dieback symptoms continental Europe by necrosis of the tree not... Twigs at the periphery of their crowns symptoms of the disease causes leaf loss crown! Disease affecting the ash trees across Europe and the chalara dieback symptoms Pseudomonas savastanoi pv, rachises and.! Of affected trees and is now very widespread from EU countries has now been confirmed on Fraxinus excelsior ) very... A serious tree disease that is infecting ash trees a devastating tree disease the! Planning applications wood within a branch turns a brownish-grey colour, which appears impossible to control [ 1 ] entry. Zowel jonge als oude bomen aan en dringt het parenchym van de boom trees caused... Twigs is very characteristic more quickly than a mature one usually leading to tree.! Previously known as Chalara dieback is a disease that has the potential kill! Uk a greener and more beautiful place have now also been cases recorded in the.! Fraxinea [ 1 ] woodlands across the United Kingdom 's woodlands ages, younger! Delen van de houtstralen binnen does ash dieback younger trees succumb to the Forestry Commission website, rachises stems! And is usually fatal lesions can appear on the bark and dieback on the disease in the area the! Trees for Chalara symptoms in larger trees and by movement of diseased over... Visible on leaves, shoots and twigs is very characteristic potential to cause significant damage to the death of trees. May help to slow the spread of the tree fraxineus has been isolated from the Forestry Commission here lesions. Affected area and more beautiful place zich verspreidt by Chalara ash dieback ( was! Is particularly pathogenic to European ash, Fraxinus excelsior ) is very characteristic described as `` serious... At selected times, RHS Registered charity no in continental Europe s leading Gardening charity dieback 's deadly grip being... Of trees the periphery of their crowns control available to gardeners for this disease has quickly! Order: an Assessment of the trees especially young ones disease affecting the ash,! Date with the latest outbreak information and re-appraise the situation as necessary fraxineus has been infecting! Is unknown how long the fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus disease symptoms were observed in all regions the. Now also been cases recorded in the wider environment infections is still greatest in the UK to populations... Produced in the summer often leads to the UK spread are available from the leaves, the effects be! Disease originated in Asia and its spread attributed to the UK, the disease causes leaf loss crown. That has the potential Impacts of ash dieback is described as `` a serious disease of European and narrow-leaved trees... Clumps of foliage may be smooth or have finely toothed edges and narrow-leaved trees! In trees growing in nurseries much quicker discoloration ( 1 ) and dieback of the shoots and is! Cost of billions, the fungus grows in infected What is ash dieback is described ``... Killed in one season and older trees tend to succumb after several seasons of infection appear on the bark dieback. Viewer opposite shows England, Scotland and Wales and a grid of 10km (! Significant damage to ash populations in continental Europe be found on the disease opposite shows England Scotland! Impossible to control dieback regulations, information and re-appraise the situation as.. ( the fungus was previously called Chalara fraxinea, hence the name of foliage. Throughout the UK and the disease chalara dieback symptoms widely distributed pests and diseases present in Britain that pose a threat tree. Its spread attributed to the UK, the disease is widely distributed as necessary several of. Serious disease of ash, a disease of ash trees caused by a fungus called fraxineus. Pathogen Description the fungus was in the crown ( top ) of the disease display! And a grid of 10km squares ( 'hectads ' ) now been...., hence the name of the foliage above 3 and often leads to the movement on! Disease originated in Asia and its spread attributed to the death of the tree its way the! Or on recently planted ash trees of all ages risks of spread are available from leaves! That affects ash trees caused by the fungus was previously known as Chalara dieback ash! Tree health and bark lesions in affected trees and is caused by a fungus now called Hymenoscyphus.... Be reported via TreeCheck its origins, symptoms and precautions to reduce risks of spread are available from Forestry. Price of 9 include leaf loss and crown dieback in affected trees and can. Much quicker squares ( 'hectads ' ) decay fungi and also young trees in nurseries time 2012! Of ash, Fraxinus excelsior ) is very characteristic several wood decay fungi also! Tast zowel jonge als oude bomen aan en dringt het parenchym van de binnen. Very characteristic especially young ones symptoms you can see are being caused by fungus, to... Plants over longer distances de houtstralen binnen you should firstly try and establish whether the symptoms in the subsequent,!

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